[Reflection] What should be in PNoy’s Bucket List?


Happy 2015 to everyone!

I believe this New Year gives all of us a resurgence of hope and energy towards the possibility for change.

As a tradition, some people used to make a New Year’s resolution to make a promise to do an act of self-improvement or something significant for the new year.

I am not really into making New Year’s Resolution. The closest I get is just to come up with a to-do list everyday. Not that I don’t live my days before by fulfilling my personal goals and plans, and that I was just caught up in a flurry of day-to-day activities. However, as my work and personal interest involve advocating for human rights, I feel the need to commit myself more to blog about human rights this year.

That’s why I have prepared a bucket list not for myself but to the Philippine government to remind them how important human rights issues are that need to be immediately addressed.
Here are the 10 wishes in my Bucket List on Human Rights for President Benigno Aquino III (PNoy) to act this year 2015:

1. PNoy must make human rights his top priority by not only making a clear political statement but most importantly by making human rights as an indicator of its development agenda.
2. Pnoy must finally adopt the National Human Rights Action Plan to guide his administration in compliance to its international human rights obligations.
3. PNoy must ensure that all human rights legislations particularly RA 9745 or the Anti-Torture Law of 2009 must be fully and seriously implemented to ensure accountability and ending impunity.
4. PNoy must recognize and guarantee the rights of victims of human rights violations for redress, justice and reparation including rehabilitation by instituting comprehensive programs and services.
5. PNoy should impose a moratorium on mining to avert its ill-effects on the environment and health and livelihood of the affected communities.
6. PNoy must stop the increase price of basic commodities and public services like MRT-LRT fare, water and electricity.
7. PNoy must ensure public health care is focused on providing the best service to people especially to marginalized sectors and not on making money through privatization.
8. PNoy must ensure that the rights of Filipino workers for decent work here and abroad are respected and guaranteed by providing them protection and assistance.
9. PNoy must translate into policies and protection measures the Philippines affirmative vote to a UN Human Rights Council resolution on discrimination and hate crimes against LGBT persons.
10. PNoy must improve the welfare and condition of teachers who are receiving the lowest salaries among the ranks of professionals and are often exploited through long working hours and over-sized classes, and deprived of benefits, even those that are mandated by law.

There are certainly a lot more to consider and the bucket list can be bottomless. But by acting on these issues, PNoy can make a significant bend in the road towards making human rights a reality in the country.

my bucket lsit

Photo file courtesy of www.thecedarsoftownandcountry.com

[Document] Right to Rehabilitation


This Discussion Paper was made and published by REDRESS in 2009 with the purpose of clarifying the reasons why rehabilitation, despite beingexpressly incorporated in different international instruments such as CAT, the ICPPED and the Rome Statute, remains an elusive form of reparation. Certainly, and as is the case with many other rights/obligations under international law, problems of implementation and enforceability are partly the result of lack of political will of states.

                                                                                                                                                              – REDRESS

REDRESS is an international nongovernmental organization committed to obtaining justice for torture survivors. The objectives and working methods they used focus on assisting survivors to pursue and secure legal remedies and developing the means to ensure compliance with international standards, and in particular their right to reparation. REDRESS consider IT fundamental to advance the understanding of the meaning of rehabilitation given that it is a crucial reparation measure for torture survivors and their next of kin.

For more info, visit REDRESS website: http://www.redress.org/

redress_logo

The Right to Rehabilitation

[Document] Healthcare for Torture victims


Healthcare for Torture Victims

Presented by Darwin Mendiola

during the Department of Health Visayas Health Cluster Meeting

on August 15, 2014 at the Hotel Essencia, Dumaguete City, Negros Oriental.

 

Health care for torture victimsHealth care for torture victims

[Reflection] Torture Rehabilitation should be victim-centered


For human rights advocates, rehabilitation of torture victims is understood as both a right of the victims and a state obligation. It should play an important role in the broader agenda of achieving justice and respect for human rights.

It must be viewed holistically as it goes beyond physical and psychological care and extend to other types of services (legal, social and economic services, e.g. education, employment, housing, etc.), that enable the victims to restore life with dignity and return to life of normalcy.

However, rehabilitation is more than just responding to victims’ basic needs. It must respond to the real impact of violations in victims’ lives and at the same time, it should be given as sincere efforts on the part of the government to acknowledge the human rights violations and to provide concrete measure of justice to those whore rights have been violated.

The participation of the victims and their families in the designing and effective implementation of rehabilitation programs and services is therefore vital. This will ensure that torture rehabilitation is tailored to each victim’s needs and their particular situation while considering the effects of torture and other violations on families, communities and larger society.

Rehabilitation programs should promote individual, family and social healing, recovery and reintegration. This may include restoring cultural practices, traditions and exercising political beliefs without fear. Working only at the individual level is not enough. There is a need to consider rehabilitation beyond the individual level and to look at social dimension of rehabilitation.

In the Philippines, the passage of the RA 9745 or Anti-Torture Law on 2009 and the promulgation of the Comprehensive Rehabilitation Program in March 2014, did not make any significant improvement in the human rights situation.

Not only for the fact the torture continues unabated, there is still a lack of adequate rehabilitation measures for torture survivors and their families. While institutional efforts are being undertaken to give flesh and blood to this normative framework, the reality remains that rehabilitation services are not yet readily available for torture victims/survivors in many countries including the Philippines.until now, relevant government agencies still have no clear operational procedure and have no budget line for its implementation.

The participation of victims and their families in addressing the issue of rehabilitation, designing rehabilitation measures and seeing these programs are implemented can contribute powerfully to its success or failure.Nevertheless, there is a need to create enabling conditions for victims’ participation that would allow victims to feel that they are valued and recognized as rights-holders.

So in order to have a common understanding of the concept of rehabilitation not only as an inherent right emerging from human rights violations but also to identify its different forms and the necessary operational mechanisms for its provisions, the victims should be at its center.

 

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